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Brandan Ray

Associate

Brandan joined Mackenzie Hughes in 2020 and is an associate in the firm’s business department. His practice primarily focuses on business formation and governance, private investment transactions, and intellectual property.

In his spare time, Brandan enjoys alpine skiing, golf, and pub trivia contests.

  • Representing clients in purchase and sale of closely held businesses, as well as ownership restructuring of closely held businesses
  • Assisting in, or managing the formation of, technology startup companies and other small business entities
  • Representing both company and investor parties respectively in angel investment and early stage equity financing transactions
  • Assisting clients with trademark filings and office actions with the United States Patent and Trademark Office
  • Could Someone “Lenz” a Hand?: Modernizing the Digital Millennium Copyright Act After Lenz v. Universal Music Corp., Boston University School of Law Journal of Science & Technology Law, (Winter 2019).
  • The Cost of “Compassionate Care”, Western New York Physician (co-authored with William Keefer, Esq.) (January 2019).
  • Member of the New York State Bar Association
  • Member of the Massachusetts Bar Association
  • Juris Doctorate, Boston University School of Law
  • Bachelor of Arts, Summa Cum Laude, Boston College
  • New York State Bar
  • Massachusetts Bar

News

Joseph G. Farrell and Brandan Ray Join Mackenzie Hughes LLP

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Joseph G. Farrell has joined Mackenzie Hughes LLP as a partner in the firm’s litigation department and will concentrate his legal practice on medical malpractice defense. Brandan Ray has also been hired as an associate attorney in the business department with his practice focused on business formation and governance, private investment transactions…

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Blog

Can I trademark “[insert food here].com”? The Supreme Court says “Maybe!”

Recently, the Supreme Court concluded another historic term, handing down landmark decisions in employment discrimination and executive immunity, among others.  However, this also means cases like United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com, B.V. (“Booking.com”), a case decided at the end of June with broad application in the area of trademark law, do not…

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